Warriors of The Net

This video’s been around for ages but it was always a favourite of mine, and though it’s a bit cheesey and out of date now (anyone for the Ping of Death?) it had a lasting impact on the way I understand the net – it’s still basically the way I visualise “packets” and “headers” :)

Vodpod videos no longer available. from www.youtube.com posted with vodpod
When I first saw it I was still based at Lime Grove (it was released in 1999 to help up-skill telecomm engineers) and the idea of using a web-clip that was more than 70MB long in the classroom was ludicrous: how times have changed.

more info on the film – http://www.mundi.net/maps/maps_024/

Google – resources for UK Schools

Google have put up a resource page here, to help teachers use their tools (Search, Maps, Earth, Images and News). It’s got lesson plans, classroom ideas and links to other Google sponsored projects such as digitalexplorer and the Google UK Carbon Footprint Project (or GUKCFP as we call it :). It’s aimed at Secondary Educators but there’s some nice stuff there and some pretty innovative links – the CarbonGame for instance is a live – pan european simulation, where European schools compete against each other in a carbon trading game.

via OUseful Info

Africa’s Web 2.0 Sites

Excellent clickable photo of Web2.0 start-ups based in Africa put up by a group Blog called Black Looks – highly recommended. As is the way when something like this gets widely blogged some of the sites may have been knocked off-line by the attention, but I’d expect them to be back up again by Monday :)

Logomap of African Web2.0 startups

(picture will open in Flickr – where it *is* clickable)

via Read/WriteWeb

cogdogroo

Cogdogroo is an absolutely fantastic wiki by Alan Levine about how to tell stories/deliver presentations using Web2.0 tools – he starts of with this version of the Cinderalla story as a demonstration of how not to do it, (though I have to say I think it’s rather good).

He then goes to on to deliver a workshop on “50 Web2.0 Ways to Tell a Story” – great tips on “prompts”, what you can do if you’re stuck about what to say; and then goes straight into doing it.

Why is it called “50 Web2.0 Ways to Tell a Story”? Because, having outlined the story he’s going to tell (the story of Dominoe), he then goes on to recreate it (gulp) using 50 of the on-line presentation tools available now – everything from photo slideshows to timelines to video mashups and beyond. He gives a brief review of the services as he goes – good stuff. The quickest way to look through it is to check his Webslides (that way you’ll also see which services aren’t working at the moment :)